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Chelton Wealth - Quanify GmbH

Privately held; Founded in 2018
6 – 10 employees

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Chelton Wealth offers investment management programmes to clients who are looking for alternative investment strategies. Covering a large spectrum of alternative strategies, Chelton Wealth offers investment solutions throughout market and economic cycles. It operates through regulated affiliated entities and partners based in the main financial centres. Chelton Wealth is supported by experienced investors and traders, as well as by investment consultants and developers of trading systems. Since inception, the company has built key strategic partnerships and works very efficiently with multiple vendors in the industry, successfully achieving to assure the four fundamental cornerstones for our clients to optimise their investment – performance and profitability: ✔ The utmost transparency and absolute absence of any conflict of interests ✔ The most reliable client – asset custodian conditions ✔ Direct access to strictly regulated and fair Interbank Market execution environments at the lowest transactional costs (No Dealing Desk intervention) ✔ The best performing trading systems and protocols. We partner with talented professionals in the industry who trade through prime bank liquidity providers and deploy state of the art technology. In addition, Chelton Wealth works with customers through every aspect of the process so that they may have a comfortable and beneficial experience. We are committed to helping all of our clients find the best strategy for managing and growing their capital and delivering unrivalled trading performance whilst focusing on reducing risk and sustaining consistent profitability over the long term. Chelton Wealth manages assets for institutional investors (including corporations, foundations, endowments and pensions), funds of hedge funds, family offices, high-net-worth individuals and recently also for retail investors.

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Never say never

Article about Never say never

Two different stories

Since the bottom of March, the S&P 500 index has already risen by 32 percent. Lockdowns are being eased everywhere and the economic figures are gradually becoming less bad. The economy will certainly not flourish in the short term as in the period before the outbreak of the virus, but seems to have left the worst phase behind. Is the relief among investors justified? That is the question. After all, the bond market speaks an entirely different language. After the interest rate on 10-year government bonds in the United States reached an All-Time Low of 0.54 percent in March, it has hardly risen since then. The current interest rate on US Treasuries is 0.69 percent. The market is even taking into account a possible further lowering of interest rates by the Federal Reserve Board.

Bonds go their own way

So shares and bonds tell a different story, which is strange. In the past, rising interest rates invariably meant disaster for equity investors. Conversely, a fall in interest rates was greeted with cheers. However, this has not been the case since the financial crisis of 2008. Once interest rates are close to zero, any increase is more likely to be seen as favourable. It indicates a return to a more normal situation. Thus, since the credit crisis, interest rates and equities have always moved in the same direction. Rising share prices were accompanied by rising interest rates. During the recovery since March, this is suddenly no longer the case.

Inflation forecast drops rapidly

What is the bond market trying to tell us? That inflation will remain low for the time being. In fact, deflation is not even out of the question. For how else can we explain that 30-year government bonds in the United States yield only 1.3 percent? When the US economy was still flourishing before the crisis, the central bank already struggled to keep inflation at a level of around two percent. It is therefore not surprising that now that the economy is going down considerably, inflation is also falling rapidly. The inflation forecast for the next 30 years is only 1.1 percent.

Inflation stayed away

The market thus ignores the many experts who chorus the fact that the coming economic recovery will boost inflation. The enormous amounts of money pumped into the economy worldwide should inevitably lead to a degree of monetary devaluation. And that would oblige the central banks to raise interest rates again after a while. It could. But that was also claimed last time when the central banks tried to combat the credit crisis with large-scale financial injections. With all their might they tried to raise inflation to two percent. But inflation stayed away.

No price increase

And now what? Unemployment is running high everywhere. So there will be no collective wage increase for the time being. The commodity index is at an all-time low. The corona crisis has only accelerated the deflationary process of digitisation of the economy. In their fierce struggle for survival, companies will lower prices rather than raise them. Where should this price increase come from? In the United States, current inflation is currently no more than 0.3 percent.

Bull market not yet over

It could well be that this inflation wave, which many expect, will not happen for the time being. In fact, a general decline in prices - deflation - is more in line with expectations. The Federal Reserve is vehemently opposed to the negative interest rate policies of other central banks and says it will never do so. "Never say never". Bond investors in the United States outperformed the stock markets this year. Maybe the already 39-year-old bull market in bonds is still not over.


American housing market resilient

Article about American housing market resilient

By Robert J. Teuwissen on May 19, 2020

House index

This week in the United States several figures are reported on the state of the housing market. Today, for example, the number of building permits and houses under construction. Together with the labour market, the housing market is the most important pillar of the U.S. economy. The state of the housing market can, therefore, provide a good insight into the state of this economy. Yesterday, the NAHB (National Association of Home Builders) published the monthly Housing Market Index, a reflection of sentiment in the construction industry. In the month of May, the index rose to 37. In April it was still 30. That was better than analysts had expected. Also noteworthy was the increase in the average price for a house of one percent compared to the same period last year.

Striking calmness

This relative calm in the housing market is striking. In the month of April alone, twice as many Americans lost their jobs as during the entire credit crisis. One-third of the tenants defaulted on their rent. Retail sales collapsed completely. The economy contracted and went through an extraordinarily tough second quarter. A sharp collapse of the housing market would then be in line with expectations. Nothing could be further from the truth. For example, the number of applications for new mortgages has risen sharply since the start of the crisis. Google registered more searches for a "new house" than before the outbreak of the pandemic.

Cares Act

Why is the housing market holding up so well in all this economic violence? Part of the explanation is temporary. For example, many homeowners, despite their inferior financial situation, are not immediately under pressure to sell, as was the case during the previous crisis. Far fewer owners are "underwater" because they had to contribute more equity as a result of the previous crisis in order to qualify for a mortgage at all. The quality of outstanding mortgages is also higher as a result of the stricter regulations. And should the water still rise to the lips, this time there is the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (Cares) Act. This law, passed in March, gives homeowners up to six months deferred payment, with the option for another six months. This grace period is extremely effective in flattening the curve. A wave of house evictions like during the previous crisis is not (yet) in evidence this time. By the way, the postponement does not mean adjustment. At a later stage, homeowners will still have to pay their debts.

Historically low-interest rates

The historically low-interest rate is also an important pillar of the housing market. For example, the interest rate on 3.3-year mortgages is only 3.3 per cent and, for the first time in history, threatens to fall below three per cent. Especially when the interest rate on 10-year government bonds remains at their current level of 0.7 percent. On the other hand, however, mortgages are much more difficult to obtain. The Credit Availability Index is at its lowest level since 2014.

Shortage of available houses

Another reason for the striking resilience of the housing market is the shortage of available houses. The current housing supply simply does not match the demographic structure of the population. For example, a large group of no less than 72 million millennials (ranging from 24 to 39 years of age) are approaching the point at which they would like to purchase their own homes. However, the United States is massively underdeveloped. A situation similar to the years after the Second World War seems to have arisen. In any case, it will not have a negative impact on the house price. In California, there were already more viewers for a house than a year ago.

More figures

Developments that may help the housing market in the world's largest economy to hold up reasonably well this time. Of course, everything depends on a possible return of the virus. And the possible thump that the economy may then have to endure. But for now, the US housing market has held up reasonably well and the dip - which wasn't too deep - seems to be behind us again. For instance, the S&P Homebuilders Index (XHB) has risen 57 percent since the bottom of March. Today the number of houses under construction and the number of building permits issued are published. A sharp drop is expected by analysts. If we can believe yesterday's report of the NAHB, that might have been the bottom.


It is your turn, consumer

Article about It is your turn, consumer

It's your turn, consumer

By: Robert Jan Teuwissen - May 8, 2020

Mass unemployment and rising stock markets

More than 30 million people in the United States have been made unemployed since the coronavirus outbreak. Companies are reporting sharp declines in profits or even losses. The economy will contract sharply in the second quarter. And the stock markets? They're rising. However, the NASDAQ, where all major US technology funds are listed, defies description. In the middle of this crisis, this index is simply in the plus for the year.

A glorious recovery?

The reason for this stock market optimism is easy to find. As always, the stock market is ahead of the real economy. Substantial contraction? Doesn't matter. It's about the state of the economy in six to twelve months. And by then, at least the beginning of a recovery from this severe economic malaise is expected. Given the huge financial injections from governments and central banks into the economies worldwide, that is certainly not a bolted assumption. Still, you can take a horse to the water, but not force it to drink. And that horse, that's the consumer.

The consumer has to do it

Because only when consumers regain confidence in the future and start spending again as they did before the crisis is a serious economic recovery possible. No less than 70 percent of the world's largest economy - that of the United States - consists of private consumption. And in the rest of the western world that is not much different. Chinese consumers are also increasingly asserting themselves.

Recovery is not self-evident

And recovery to old consumption habits is not easy. For example, recent figures show that consumer confidence in both the European Union and the United States has completely disappeared. The consumer confidence index in the United States even dropped to 86 points in April, a drop of almost 30 percent compared to March. It was not only consumer confidence that fell sharply. Consumers also put this lack of confidence in practice. Spending fell by 8.7 percent, the largest decline since the Second World War.

No buffers

When many people lose their jobs and the rest are afraid of the same thing, such a collapsed spending pattern doesn't seem so strange. Bear in mind that half of Americans do not have any savings. So there are hardly any buffers to absorb a little misfortune. Spending on travel, catering, leisure and other less essential things then soon comes under pressure. The government, therefore, tries to support its citizens with stimulus cheques of 1200 dollars per person, rising to 3400 dollars per family of four. The American savesHowever, money has hardly been spent so far. Credit card companies report a large decrease in the use of credit cards. The American appears to be doing something he hasn't done for a long time. He has started saving. Savings seem to rise to levels not shown for a long time. On the one hand understandable and sensible. On the other hand, the American economy runs on the exuberant spending pattern of the average consumer. As long as those expenditures do not recover, there can be no serious recovery of the economy.

Psychological consequences

And we'll have to wait and see. Because this crisis has not only economic but also psychological consequences. The question is whether the many over-65s - accounting for 20 percent of all expenditures - will ever return to their "normal" spending pattern. Will they travel and visit restaurants as before? And museums? Just the question. And will life ever be the same as it used to be? China is a good example. Consumers are allowed to do almost anything there again but remain very cautious in their consumption behaviour. Something that foreign multinationals active in the country in particular unanimously agree.

Not less, but different

By the way, it is not said that the spending pattern as a whole will decrease. In any case, it will change in composition. A process that had been going on for years - the digitisation of society - has gained momentum. Online shopping, having meals delivered, meeting remotely and making fewer unnecessary journeys, it could well be permanent. According to administrators of large technology companies, digital development has accelerated as a result of the crisis. What would normally have taken two years now happened in two weeks? Something for investors to take into account.

Chelton Wealth - Quanify GmbH is an independent asset manager. We serve private individuals, institutions, foundations and entrepreneurs with independent and personal asset management. If you would also like to be kept up to date with the latest news, please sign up here for our weekly newsletter. Would you like to know more about the possibilities? Then request a callback. We will contact you without obligation.

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Banks, from problem to solution

Article about Banks, from problem to solution

The Great Recession

Twelve years ago, the world entered a severe financial crisis. The Great Recession was a fact. Banks had done their devastating work with unbridled lending and risky investments in the hunt for even greater returns and profits. Their failing policies contributed to a wave of bankruptcies, unemployment, economic contraction and sharply lower house and share prices. Authorities around the world had to take firm action. In order to save the economy, the banks had to stay afloat. Contrary to the population's sense of justice, large amounts of taxpayers' money flowed into the banking system worldwide.

Twelve years later

Balance sheets were strengthened, regulations were tightened and unrestricted lending was curbed. Banks survived, but at a not inconsiderable price. We are now 12 years on and the world is once again in the grip of a crisis. This time the threat comes from outside, but once again the financial system is being tested to the limit. Global lockdowns have shut the economy down everywhere. The economic damage is on an unprecedented scale.

Necessary link

With fiscal and monetary policies of unprecedented proportions, the authorities around the world are trying to save the economy from total collapse. Although the money comes from the central banks and the taxpayers, the banks are crucial in these operations. They are the necessary link through which the money finds its way to the affected businesses and citizens. The credits are directly or indirectly guaranteed by the state.

From cause to solution

Of the cause of all the misery in 2008, banks have now become part of the solution. However, in order to fulfil this role, their resilience is being tested more than ever. Because get on with it. They already have their backs against the wall because of historically low-interest rates and increasingly far-reaching government regulations. The economic contraction is also expected to break post-war records this quarter. Companies will go bankrupt, repayments will not be paid, people will lose their jobs and will no longer be able to pay their mortgages. Banks are now in the process of making their provisions, but the uncertainty about the virus raises strong doubts as to whether it will be sufficient.

Strong enough?

Of course, the banks are much better off than 12 years ago, but are they strong enough? Investors think it's theirs to witness the sharply declining stock market prices of bank shares. Dividend payments are being withheld. Poach pots filled to the rim. Credits are guaranteed and rules relaxed. Last week, the European Central Bank took another measure to support the banks in their serving role. Banks that provide targeted credit to citizens and businesses can borrow from the ECB at an interest rate of minus one percent. There will also be pandemic loans for smaller banks, without special conditions.

Subsidy

These negative interest rates are in fact a direct subsidy to the banks. According to the ECB, no less than 3000 billion euros in loans will become available to banks. It is a form of monetary policy that other central banks - such as those of the United States and Japan - have not yet dared to implement. Clearly, this crisis is being fought too hard and the banking system is the weapon with which the authorities will fight the enemy - an economic collapse.

Are investors wrong

The stock market prices of, for example, UBS and Credit Suisse show that investors do not yet have that much confidence. They could be mistaken about the firmness of the authorities and the resilience of the banking system. In any case, that's what we assume. We have to assume that, or rather. Because otherwise there is a chance that this crisis will turn out to be something more than a Great Recession.

Chelton Wealth - Quanify GmbH is an independent asset manager. We serve private individuals, institutions, foundations and entrepreneurs with independent and personal asset management. If you would also like to be kept up to date with the latest news, please sign up here for our weekly newsletter. Would you like to know more about the possibilities? Then request a callback. We will contact you without obligation.

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The crisis makes Big Tech even stronger

Article about The crisis makes Big Tech even stronger

Avalanche of bad news

Every day, investors get an avalanche of bad news poured over them. The economy collapses, corporate profits evaporate, unemployment rises to record highs and national debts rise sharply. In amazement, investors and analysts look at the stock prices on the boards. How is it possible that, for example, the measure of the American economy - the S&P 500 index - only 11 percent is at a loss in the middle of what has already been called the worst economic crisis since the 1930s?

The Big Five

Below the surface, however, there is more going on. When the five largest companies are filtered out, the drop in the index suddenly turns out to be much bigger. These five shares together account for more than 20 percent of the total market capitalisation of the index. It is no coincidence that they are all five technology companies. Microsoft, Amazon, Alphabet, Apple and Facebook together are largely responsible for this relatively limited loss of the index.

Nasdaq 100

For example, the Nasdaq 100 index - in which the five are even more strongly represented, accompanied by other strong technology funds - appears to be in the plus this year. Yes, in the midst of this severe crisis, the technology index is on the upside. Online retailer Amazon and data centre Equinix even recently realised a new All-Time High, while other tech funds are not far from there. Now this Nasdaq 100 index has an impressive track record anyway. This index has never had a losing year since the previous crisis - the one of 2008.

Quality comes first

Where usually in times of crisis quality comes to the surface and the air is blown hard from overvalued shares, we now see a striking phenomenon. Where banks, insurance companies, oil companies and producers of consumer goods have lost up to half of their value, many "overvalued" tech funds remain nicely located. In fact, a number of them are continuing to rise, in the face of all the crises.

Creative destruction

Here is what the Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter once so beautifully called "creative destruction" at work. Capitalism is characterised by regularly recurring periods of decline. In such a period of crisis, it says goodbye to outdated production methods and business models. New, innovative companies and production techniques take their place. A crisis is in fact nothing more than a necessary clean-up of the outdated system. In every crisis, the foundation is laid for a new ascending phase.

Digital acceleration

And that's exactly what we're witnessing right now. Microsoft Teams enables meetings from home, Amazon keeps the business running during the lockdown, Google makes anonymous location data and travel movements of users available to governments to combat the virus, Equinix enables the storage of all the increased data traffic and Nvidia stimulates the further development of artificial intelligence. Big Tech suddenly proves to be very useful during pandemics.

Huge cash buffers

During the corona crisis, the digital economy turned out to be just as vital as, for example, the energy supply. The fact that the tech giants also have huge cash buffers will only speed up this process. Cash not only enables them to get through this crisis unscathed but also - now that prices have fallen sharply - to take over other companies and thus further strengthen their own market position. Quarterly figures This week, the major technology funds will present their figures for the past quarter. Given the high expectations and the better than expected prices, it cannot be ruled out that the results will disappoint investors somewhat. But even a price correction will turn out to be no more than a new buying moment as this crisis is laying a new foundation for a new upward trend.

Chelton Wealth - Quanify GmbH is an independent asset manager. We serve private individuals, institutions, foundations and entrepreneurs with independent and personal asset management. If you would also like to be kept up to date with the latest news, please sign up here for our weekly newsletter. Would you like to know more about the possibilities? Then request a callback. We will contact you without obligation. M

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Powell saves the market

Article about Powell saves the market

A new report from the BIS

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS), i.e. the bank of central banks, recently published its latest report. Now the BIS is an authoritative institute that, partly because of its position, has a good insight into the ins and outs of the financial world. Because of their position, they generally know more than you and I do. In the last decade, for example, the institute already warned of the possible outbreak of a credit crisis. This time the BIS came up with an astonishingly detailed description of the situation on the stock exchanges in the recent period. According to the BIS, the financial markets have been on the brink of collapse. And not for the first time.

Whatever it takes

In 2012, the Governor of the European Central Bank saved the financial world from a possible collapse with his now-famous statement "whatever it takes". It will probably never be confirmed but Mario Draghi did not speak these winged words on his own initiative. According to strong rumours, the assignment did not come from one of the European capitals either, but directly from the White House. There sat someone who got quite the jitters from the fact that the European economy seemed to sink completely into an ever deeper swamp. The lines between the power of the earth are short, very short sometimes.QE4In recent weeks, the US central bank, the Federal Reserve, announced far-reaching support measures. With this, QE4 has officially been launched. Not only was the interest rate lowered to zero, but the central bank is also going to buy up government and mortgage bonds on a large scale again. This time, however, the Federal Reserve goes further than previous times. Corporate bonds and Exchange Traded Funds are also part of the package. Bridging loans will become available for states and cities, loans will be granted to small and medium-sized enterprises and last but not least, the central bank will expand its repo operations abroad. An unprecedented stimulus package not comparable to previous support packages.

International repo operations

These international repo transactions, in particular, are crucial. There is too little room to elaborate on them here, but one can assume that in this situation the Fed operates as the lender of last resort. Without the Fed, consumers in several European countries would have gone to the ATM without the Fed. The deeper the crisis, the greater the shortage of dollars worldwide. A nice indicator of this is the exchange rate of the dollar. It rises as the crisis increases in size and vice versa. It is for this reason that the dollar is probably the safest refuge in times of unrest. Once again.

Mario did it before

Anyway, with his unprecedented support operation, the Federal Reserve has done what Mario Draghi did to them eight years ago. The minutes of the Federal Reserve showed how much the central bank was concerned about the condition of the American economy in particular. An unknown and vicious virus was able to uncover its shortcomings. Initially, Powell's measures met with a great deal of incomprehension among analysts and investors. Why bring such heavy artillery into position? Now it turns out that the central bankers knew very well what they were doing. They did the right thing.

Powell

Powell seems to have saved the financial world from imminent destruction. As far as we know, the central banker doesn't wear a mouth cap yet, but his actions are remarkable. Originally he made his appearance as a rather colourless figure, but in the meantime, he has grown into someone capable of very great deeds. Brave and decisive. But what are the consequences? The central bank's balance sheet has swollen to 6200 billion dollars. And that's probably just the beginning. In fact, the United States has gone into monetary financing. The debts of the United States are rising to historic highs and are being bought up by the central bank. The steam is coming out of the money presses. Who's going to pay this bill?

Chelton Wealth - Quanify GmbH is an independent asset manager. We serve private individuals, institutions, foundations and entrepreneurs with independent and personal asset management. If you would also like to be kept up to date with the latest news, please sign up here for our weekly newsletter. Would you like to know more about the possibilities? Then request a callback. We will contact you without obligation.

Missed an article? No problem, just visit our MARKET BLOG


Reaching higher with another award

Chelton Wealth keeps reaching higher levels of quality and our hard work is constantly being rewarded.

Our most recent achievement is another award from BarclayHedge!

Chelton Wealth has ranked number 3 in the Currency Traders Managing More Than $10M category for October 2019.

We are very proud of this award and hope to continue providing you, our investors, with performance and quality service.

You can find out more about the award here https://cheltonwealth.com/awards/

Interested in finding out more about our managed accounts, request a demo from the Chelton Wealth team here https://cheltonwealth.com/contact/

Team Chelton Wealth


Martin Signer activities: Managing Director, IR, test, Testing, Testing, Participant, Partner, Media partner, Media partner, Event manager, Events, Tester, Event listing, Tester, IR, IR, Test, Managing Director, IR, IR, IR, IR Partner, Partner, Employer, IR, IR, IR, IR, IR, IR, IR, IR
MartinSigner
5 months ago

Very interesting article

Recognition award for excellence Top 10, September 2019

Article about Recognition award for excellence Top 10, September 2019

We are pleased to announce that Chelton Wealth has been featured in BarclayHedge's Monthly performance rankings. Chelton Wealth has ranked number 5 in the Currency Traders Managing More Than $10M category for September 2019.

BarclayHedge offers performance rankings on 17 hedge fund categories, including Fund of Funds.

For more than 30 years, BarclayHedge has been the benchmark for Alternative Investment data and indices. It is recognised as an industry-leading Alternative database assisting investors to analyse the performance of more than 6,900 hedge funds and managed account programmes worldwide.

To find out more about our performance, please request more information https://cheltonwealth.com/contact/

To see our awards, please visit https://cheltonwealth.com/awards/


Top performing CTA Past year ending June 2019

Article about Top performing CTA Past year ending June 2019

We are pleased to announce that Chelton Wealth has been featured in the quarterly publication, Barclay Managed Funds Report (BMFR).

Chelton Wealth ranked as a Top 20 CTA performer in the ''PAST YEAR'' category for 1year ending June 2019

.For more than 30 years, BarclayHedge has been the benchmark for Alternative Investment data and indices. It is recognised as an industry-leading Alternative Investment Database assisting investors to analyse the performance of more than 6,900 hedge funds and managed account programmes worldwide.

Please visit our website for more information or request a detailed factsheet of our programme(s). www.cheltonwealth.comTel. 41 44 586 5051 or email support@cheltonwealth.com


Recognition Award for Excellence

Article about Recognition Award for Excellence

We are pleased to announce that Chelton Wealth has been featured in BarclayHedge's monthly performance rankings. Chelton Wealth has ranked #3 in the Currency Traders managing more than $10 M category for June 2019.

For more information, please visit our website: www.cheltonwealth.com

Email: info@cheltonwealth.com Tel. +41 44 586 5051


Fund peak Top 5 Year to date and Top 5 Sharpe Ratio

Article about Fund peak Top 5 Year to date and Top 5 Sharpe Ratio

We are pleased to announce that Chelton Wealth's Currency Alpha Program has been featured in Fundpeak as  #5 place in the ''Top 5 Year to Date'' category.

The Chelton Wealth's Alternative I Program reached the #2 place in the  ''Top 5 Sharpe Ratio'' category.

Fundpeak is a Managed Futures database platform which connects managed futures fund managers with investors and provides under-laying data for informed investment decision and ongoing performance monitoring.

To find out more about us and receive our track record in your inbox, please sign up here https://cheltonwealth.com/contact/ or call +41 44 586 5051, email: support@cheltonwealth.com

 


Top 20 CTA Performer in the Past Year category

Article about Top 20 CTA Performer in the Past Year category

We are pleased to announce that Chelton Wealth has been featured in the quarterly publication, Barclay Managed Funds Report (BMFR). Chelton Wealth ranked as a Top 20 CTA performer in the ''PAST YEAR'' category for 1st quarter 2019.

For more than 30 years, BarclayHedge has been the benchmark for Alternative Investment data and indices. It is recognised as an industry-leading Alternative Investment Database assisting investors to analyse the performance of more than 6,900 hedge funds and managed account programmes worldwide.

Please visit our website for more information or request a detailed factsheet of our programme(s). www.cheltonwealth.com

Tel. +41 44 586 5051 or email support@cheltonwealth.com

 


Do you know?

Martin Signer activities: Managing Director, IR, test, Testing, Testing, Participant, Partner, Media partner, Media partner, Event manager, Events, Tester, Event listing, Tester, IR, IR, Test, Managing Director, IR, IR, IR, IR Partner, Partner, Employer, IR, IR, IR, IR, IR, IR, IR, IR

Martin Signer

Managing Director at 4Finance


Aimee Moore activities: Event Director

Aimee Moore

Event Director at iGlobal Forum



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